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Welsh Terrier Breed Summary

Cheerful, Playful, Energetic, Calm and Independent

These doggies are fairly unknown across the UK and are therefore a vulnerable breed, with only around 380 in existence! However, they are very happy chappys and are extremely playful in nature. They are also very gentle as compared to other Terrier breeds which means they do well with children.

In terms of their appearance, they have thick and wiry coats with lots of hair around their little faces - how could you resist! They don't shed too much but they do require lots grooming which means they can be very high maintenance.

Fun Fact: All puppies are born with black coats which change as they grow!

Kennel Club Group Terrier
Lifespan 12 - 13 years
Height (at the withers) Males 39 cm, Females 39 cm at the withers
Weight Males 9.0 - 9.5 kg, Females 9.0 - 9.5 kg
Coat They have Hard and Wiry Coats that Lie Tight to the Body. The Undercoat is Softer and Denser
Colour Black & Tan
Eye colour Dark
Common health issues Paroxysmal Dyskinesia, Masticatory Muscle Myositis (MMM), Primary Lens Luxation (PLL), Skin allergies
Other Names Welshie

These doggies are well-known for their cheerful dispositions as well as their affectionate and loyal devotion to their ‘hooman’ families! They’re incredibly playful doggies who are full of energy and so get along with children fairly well. Compared to other Terriers, they are also fairly calm, making them good pets for elderly people, who may otherwise struggle with an excitable dog. However, Welsh Terriers are also a fairly independent breed which can make training a little bit of a pain! But as long as they are socialised and begin their training from a young age, they will make lovely family pets.

Much of these doggy’s history remains a mystery, although it is thought that they may well be one of the oldest Terrier breeds in the world! They were originally known under a different name as Black-and-Tan Wire-Haired Terrier (quite a mouthful!) and also the Old English Terriers as well. It’s thought that these doggies lived across most of England during the 19th century, though they are mainly associated with Wales. They were used to hunt animals such as otters, badgers and foxes and were well-known for their ability to extinguish vermin! They were officially classified by the Kennel Club in 1885 and reached the States in 1888. Since then, Welsh Terriers have gradually increased in popularity over the years!