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The Miniature Bull Terrier Shop

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Miniature Bull Terrier Breed Summary

Intelligent, Comical, Happy, Stubborn and Loving

These dogs are a tiny version of their larger relative the Bull Terrier. They are discussed as being easier to manage, both due to their size and personalities. They are very loyal and loving by nature and love to take part in all aspects of family living.

They do need a lot of exercise however, their size means that they are happy to live in an apartment so long as they get plenty of walks and playtime. They can get bored very easily, so do better when they have something to occupy them.

Fun Fact: They don't require a large amount of grooming, meaning they are a cheaper breed to keep!

Kennel Club Group Terrier
Lifespan 10 - 14 Years
Height (at the withers) Males and Females 10in - 14in
Weight Males and Females 18lb - 28lb
Coat Coats are Short, Fine, Glossy and Close to the Skin
Color White, White with Any other Color
Eye color Dark
Common health issues Patellar Luxation (dislocation of the kneecap), Kidney Problems, Lens Luxation, Heart Problems, Deafness

These dogs, although their ancestors may have been developed for fighting, actually make delightful family pets. They are highly intelligent and need lots of daily mental stimulation to keep them from getting bored. Their strong sense of humor will have you rolling around on the floor in fits of laughter! As these guys have Terrier in them they tend to be fairly stubborn, meaning they're not necessarily the best option for first time owners. They require a lot of training and need to be taught their place in the pack! Because they love their humans so much, they don’t do well on their own for long periods of time as this can lead to separation anxiety. This means they need someone to be home with them most of the day.

The Bull Terrier was created as a fighting dog in the 1830s by crossing Bulldogs with now-extinct English terriers. Soon after, breeders began work on a miniaturized version to use as above-ground ratters (as opposed to “go to ground” terriers, who burrow into the earth in search of quarry). The result of a very long trial period was the Mini. Today, Minis are companion dogs, but the ratter instinct and a protective streak remain as souvenirs of the breed’s formative years. The Miniature Bull Terrier was accepted as a breed by the American Kennel Club in 1991.