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Sussex Spaniel Breed Summary

Intelligent, Calm, Gentle and Affectionate

These doggies are one of the oldest breeds native to the UK and have been around since the early 1800's. The breeds main enthusiast was a landowner called Mr Fuller, who kept Sussex Spaniels on his estate. It's thought he bred them for over 50 years and had great success in his endeavours. However, the onset of WW2 saw a dramatic decline in the number of doggies, with only five remaining! They were luckily saved by breed enthusiasts and the numbers have slowly started to crawl back up. Nowadays, about 100 are born every year, meaning they are still relatively rare and anyone wanting to share their home with one of these guys would need to register their interest with a breeder.

Kennel Club Group Gundog Group
Lifespan 10 – 12 years
Height (at the withers) Males 38cm – 41cm, Female 38cm – 41cm
Weight Males and Females 16kg – 20kg
Coat Medium, Dense and Wavy coat
Colour Black or Brown
Eye colour Hazel

Sussex Spaniels, unlike other gun dogs, get very excited when they find something and will nearly always let their owners know as well. This often means that they are known to bark, a trait deeply embedded into their psyches. However, they are very calm and gentle, often taking life at a slower pace unlike their other Spaniel relatives. However, they still need lots of physical and mental stimulation to remain happy and well-rounded doggies. These guys don't like to be left by themselves as this can lead to them developing separation anxiety which can result in destructive behaviours. Therefore they will need someone to be home for most of the day. But their love for 'hoomans' and ability to thrive in a family environment, makes them lovely family pets.

Sussex Spaniels are one of the oldest native breeds in the UK having been around since the early 1800's. One of the breed's main enthusiasts was a landowner by the name of Mr. Augustus Elliott Fuller who kept Sussex Spaniels and others at his kennels on his large estate that was situated in the county of Sussex. He bred spaniels over a time span of 50 years as working dogs with great success.

Although there were other Sussex Spaniels around at the time, breed numbers dropped by the end of World War II and by 1945, there were only 7 known to be in existence. Fortunately, thanks to the efforts and hard work of breed enthusiasts including one lady in particular by the name of Mrs. Freer, the Sussex Spaniel was saved from extinction and the Sussex Spaniel Association was later formed in 1924. Slowly through careful and selective breeding, Sussex Spaniel numbers started to rise over the ensuing decades albeit it slowly.