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Just for Polish Lowland Sheepdogs

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Polish Lowland Sheepdog Breed Summary

Playful, Loyal, Protective, Alert and Energetic

These dogs are from, yeah you guessed it, Poland! They are highly prized dogs within their native country and have been around for a very long time, making them one of the most ancient Polish breeds of all time.

They have since found a large fan base here in the UK as well as in other parts of the world as well. This is mainly due to both their lovely looks and their kind and loyal natures.

Fun Fact: In Polish, their names are Polski Owczarek Nizinny - have fun pronouncing that one!

Kennel Club Group Pastoral
Lifespan 9 - 15 years
Height (at the withers) Males 45 - 50 cm, Females 42 - 47 cm at the withers
Weight Males 18 - 20 kg, Females 16 - 18 kg
Coat Coats are Long, Shaggy and Dense. Topcoats are much Softer with a Dense Undercoat
Colour Any Colour
Eye colour Hazel or Brown
Common health issues Hip dysplasia, Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), Skin allergies
Other Names Polski Owczarek Nizinny, PON

These doggies are known for their charming and playful personalities. They normally don't mature until quite late, meaning they have puppy traits for at least a year and a half! They are high-spirited and very intelligent, which paired with their fantastic memory makes them fairly easy to train. They form very strong bonds with their owners, and their weariness of strangers and alertness makes them fantastic watch dogs. Additionally, they are a very energetic breed and will need plenty of exercise. For this reason, they best suit a family who already live an active lifestyle, that a dog could easily slot into. Overall though, they make lovely family pets and have the ability to provide you with years of joy and happiness!

Polish Lowland Sheepdogs are a native breed to Poland and were originally bred to both guard and herd flocks of sheep. These guys are a very old breed and date back to the 13th century! It's thought that they came to Scotland via Polish Sailors, who exchanged the dogs for other animals when they arrived on British Shores. Additionally, it's thought that the breed may have assisted in the creation of other native sheepdogs as well. The onset of WW2 saw a huge decline in the number of this breed, but they were saved thanks to the dedication of several breeders. Nowadays, they are a fairly well-known breed but as so few puppies are born in the UK, you will have to go on a waiting list if you want to share a home with one of these doggies.