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Lurcher Breed Summary

Energetic, Fast, Affectionate, Sociable Doggies

These doggies are cross breeds, typically their parents are Terriers, Collies and Sheepdogs crossed with Greyhounds. They are often described as being all-purpose hunting doggies but also make lovely companion dogs and pets just as well.

Their immense popularity in the UK is down to their adaptability; they are just as happy relaxing in their family homes as they are running around in a field! Unfortunately, they are not yet recognised by the Kennel Club yet, but at the end of the day, you will have a loving doggy, and that's all that really matters!

Fun Fact: They are very cunning thieves and will swipe at any food that you may have left out!

Lifespan 12 - 15 years
Height (at the withers) 55 - 71 cm at the withers
Weight 27 - 32 kg
Coat They can have either Fine and Close Coats or, they can have Rough, Coarse Coats or Smoother Ones (Dependent on Parent Breeds)
Colour Black, White, Red, Blue, Fawn, Fallow, Brindle
Eye colour Dark
Common health issues Bloat, Heart problems, Bone cancer, A sensitivity to anaesthetic and certain drugs, Ivermectin sensitivity, Sodium pentothal anaesthetic sensitivity, Eye issues, Hypothyroidism, Muscle and foot injuries, Torn toenails

Lurchers are well known for their calm and affectionate ways; however, they can become very timid or aggressive if not trained properly. It is therefore vital to start training and socialising these pups from a young age, to stop any unsavoury personality characteristics from developing. Because they are built to run, you will need a high and strong fence, to stop your doggies from running into roads or other busy areas. Needless to say, these doggies are not happy if solely kept outside, but would rather be inside with the attention of their families, where they be sociable and warm. This breed loves to go on long walks, so it’s vital they get exercise every day and also the opportunity to run free in a large, safe and enclosed area to release some energy!

The Lurcher is the result of crossbreeding a Sighthound and a Herding or Terrier breed and it is thought that this came about due to bans on some hounds, such as Irish Wolfhounds and Scottish Deerhounds. As a result, many people crossed the breeds to avoid legal problems. Essentially though, they were bred to produce a Sighthound that was both intelligent and fast, making them more able to poach small mammals, such as rabbits and hares. Still to this day, the breed is predominantly a working dog and can also often be seen being raced. Unfortunately for these doggies, they are not recognised by the Kennel Club, not that they’d care though, as they only love having a job to do that will keep them busy!